Columbia, SC (WLTX) - A group looking to make changes in schools to help students with dyslexia Is expected at the State House Thursday afternoon.

Hundreds of thousands of people grow up coping with dyslexia. Some say early detection is key to controlling the lifelong battle.

According to Understood, a non profit for families with dyslexia, it affects 1 in 5 people.

A bill moving through the State House would change the way schools help students with dyslexia. If passed, here's what that bill would do:

  • Require schools to screen students in Kindergarten through second grade for characteristics of dyslexia beginning with the 2019-2020 school year.
  • Require schools to offer dyslexia screening at the request of parents.
  • Require local school districts to have teams analyzing data from the screenings.
  • Require school districts to assist teachers in planning and implementing appropriate instruction and evidence based intervention for all students.
  • Require dyslexia-specific interventions for students indicated by screenings.
  • Require education department to provide related professional devolvement resources for educators.
  • Require the State Board of Education to create a dyslexia council to advise the debarment in matters relating to dyslexia.

You can read the full bill proposal here.

The bill was introduced back in January and approved by the South Carolina Education K-12 subcommittee.

Decoding Dyslexia South Carolina is the organization supporting the bill. They will be hosting a dyslexia awareness rally at the State House grounds on Dyslexia Day, March 1, 2018.

The group says they will be holding red umbrellas, a symbol of dyslexia awareness.

The organization uses Facebook to connect with families and offer resources to people in South Carolina. Decoding Dyslexia has a specific page for every state and also a page designated for military families.


Decoding Dyslexia South Carolina Facebook here.

Decoding Dyslexia Military Facebook here.