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Columbia, SC (WLTX) -- It's a new day in South Carolina, with new and different faces leading the state's Democrat and Republican parties.

At 31-years-old, Matt Moore is the youngest person to chair a Republican party in the country, but he's no stranger to South Carolina politics.

Before taking over the party, Moore served as its executive director in 2011 and 2012. The Georgia Tech graduate also served as State Director for newly appointed U.S. Senator Tim Scott and advised on several gubernatorial campaigns.

"It's not about me, it's about taking the republican party here and its great leaders over the past 20 or 30 years and making it even stronger that's what I'm committed to doing. I'm gonna go to every county in this state and build the kind of party that it takes to win in 2014 and beyond that it my mission," said Moore.

He takes over after the resignation of former party chairman Chad Connelly, who stepped down to take a position with the Republican National Committee. Moore says he plans to do outreach with action not just words.

"It's about more than having a listening session, it's about building the kind of relationships and conversations with those groups that that leads to success that leads to them voting for us," he said.

On the other side of the political aisle you find Jaime Harrison, the new leader of South Carolina democrats, and the first African-American to fill the role.

"What I want to be known for is not as the first African-American chair but as the best chair of the democratic party, the chair that brings back the governorship, that wins a U.S. Senate race that picks up some congressional seats, that's what I want to be my accolades," said Harrison, who takes over after former chair Dick Harpootlian.

He has experience with the state party as well. Before his election he served as First Vice-Chairman of the party. He also worked as a high school teacher in his hometown of Orangeburg, and worked as the Director of Floor Operations and counsel for Congressman Jim Clyburn.

"We're gonna go out and trumpet our principals, and not only are we gonna tell people we're gonna show them what our principals are as well," said Harrison.

Despite their different political positions both men represent a change of sorts for their parties and both say they are ready to take on the challenge.

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