Making the vodka takes about a week. It begins in a mash cooker before it's sent to the fermenter where it stays for four or five days.

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Copper Horse Distilling has been around for a few years, but its first product will be hitting the shelves in the upcoming weeks.

Owner Richard Baker originally planned to distill whiskey, but that process takes up to seven years.

While his barrels age, he decided to start making vodka using all local products, like grain from Adluh Mills.

"We want to make something specifically for our local market," said Baker. "We want people to have an option when they go to the liquor store or go to a bar or restaurant that this was made locally from local grains. Let's try it."

Baker says his company is a symbol to keep getting back on the horse, and he says the business is definitely living up to its name.

"This process, you hit a lot of hiccups," said Baker. "We had hoped that it would be June, then something pushed us into July, then August. Unfortunately a lot of people ask for the product, but it's one hurdle after another to get it on the shelves."

Making the vodka takes about a week. It begins in a mash cooker before it's sent to the fermenter where it stays for four or five days.

Next, the mixture is put in the still where the ethanol is distilled and condensed into liquid form.

"The vodka's an unfiltered vodka. We're letting some of those grain notes go through whereas most people are doing their process a little differently. We're giving bartenders a choice on some unique flavors so they can make cocktails and beverages that their clients would like," said Baker.

Copper Horse Vodka will be available throughout the state beginning in August, and the exact dates will be announced on his website.

Around the same time, Baker's tasting room will open to allow locals to measure up his product to the bigger names.

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