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(WLTX) - What happens to your digital life after you die?

If you have kids, you likely have designated a godfather or godmother to raise your kids if you're gone. You could also designate a blogmother and blogfather.

We've got a few examples of some websites that can help you out.

Legacy Locker:

Legacy Lockerpromises to manage all your digital stuff and handle the hard questions like "is he or she really dead?" and "are you the digital beneficiary?"

Legacy Locker was one of the first services to be offered in this arena and is a trusted service for transferring access to digital assets, including e-mail, social media accounts to trusted sources.

Legacy locker is $30 a year or $300 for a one time fee.

Deathswitch:

Deathswitchis a service that periodically prompts the account holder to provide a pre-determined password to ensure they're still alive.If that person doesn't enter a password on multiple occasions for a period of time, it assumes that the person is dead and begins sending out personalized pre-written messages to chosen contacts. The service can be used in many way,s including sending passwords, financial information, final wishes, last words,and funeral instructions.

With a free subscription, you can create one message to be e-mailed to one recipient; for $19.95 per year, you can prepare up to 30 messages.

AssetLock:

AssetLock is a service that focuses on mass storage of important information that may be crucial for others to know after a death.This includes information on financials, estate planning, insurance policies and final wishes. It has the capacity to store letters to be sent after a death, as well.

AssetLock is customizable.For example, you can choose the number of "recipients" necessary to unlock an account.So if you want at least five people to verify a death with the service before they unlock information, you can do that.

Pricing plans range from $9.95 per year to $239.95 for lifetime membership.

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