Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-South Carolina, said Tuesday, "The state of South Carolina should get some help from the federal government in terms of paying the bill too."

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Columbia, SC (WLTX) As South Carolina schools get ready to start this month, there's something they can't plan for—whether they'll be getting any of the 350 undocumented immigrant children sent here from the border. The federal government won't say who the children are, how old they are, who they're staying with, or where they are because of privacy laws.

Gov. Nikki Haley says she's frustrated by not being able to get any information from the Department of Homeland Defense, not even a vague idea of where the children are. "That was the question I gave Secretary Johnson was, 'Can you at least give us the area so we can prepare these schools and prepare everyone?' And he said no," she says.

Most larger school districts could handle some unexpected children showing up on the first day of school, but, depending on how many of the children show up in a particular place, some of the smaller or rural districts could find themselves with too few teachers, meaning larger classes.

Gov. Haley says, "I think the schools are going to have to do a lot of what state government's having to do, which is to figure this out. And, you know, when kids show up, by federal law we are required to educate them and we are required to give health care."

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-South Carolina, said Tuesday, "The state of South Carolina should get some help from the federal government in terms of paying the bill too."

Gov. Haley says she's going to keep pushing for answers.

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