Hurricane Matthew Forecasted to Make a Sharp Turn Near SC

Jim Gandy's latest update on the storm.

(WLTX) - Hurricane Matthew's track took a big shift Wednesday, but it's still too early to tell how much an effect the massive storm will have on South Carolina--but it will have some.

Matthew currently has maximum sustained winds of 115 miles an hour, and is moving to the northwest at 12 miles an hour. 

Currently, there is a hurricane watch in effect for the southern coastal waters of South Carolina. That watch is in effect for South Santee River south to the South Carolina and Georgia border.  More watches could be issued by the National Hurricane Center late Wednesday or early Thursday. 

The storm will continue to move across the Bahamas over the next day. By Friday, however, if the current forecast track holds, Matthew would move right along the Florida coast--or perhaps move inland--somewhere from north of West Palm Beach to Titusville. 

The forecast models then have it making a gradual turn toward the northeast, and then an even sharper turn in that direction when it's about off the South Carolina coast near Beaufort County, taking it back out into the Atlantic. Then the models have it doing something you don't usually see: moving southeast.

Will that scenario play out, and what will it mean? It's still far too early to say. There are still models that have the storm moving closer to the South Carolina coast; plus, it's unclear how the models could change if Matthew actually pushes inland when it reaches Florida's eastern coastline. 

If the current model holds, the coast of South Carolina would receive heavy rain that likely will cause flooding and high winds for most of Saturday into Sunday. The Midlands would get light to moderate rain, and some gusty winds. 

As always, it's important to note that these projections will likely shift more over the next few days--that's the nature of these forecast models, especially since there are still so many variables out there that could case the track to shift. For that reason, all residents along the coast of South Carolina and inland for about 150 to 200 miles should continue to monitor this storm's progress closely.

You can always get the latest conditions by downloading WLTX's apps or signing up for our text alerts.

Weather App Phone:  on.wltx.com/WLTX_Weather_iPhone

Weather App Android: on.wltx.com/WLTX_Weather_Android

iPhone app: on.wltx.com/1NTHH98

Android app: on.wltx.com/1NTHvXq

Sign Up for WLTX Text Alerts: Text Alert Signup Page


JOIN THE CONVERSATION

To find out more about Facebook commenting please read the
Conversation Guidelines and FAQs

Leave a Comment