Tropical Storm Irma Forms Far Off in the Atlantic

The storm is expected track toward the west, but it's unclear if it will strike the United States.

Columbia, SC (WLTX) - Tropical Storm Irma has formed in the deep Atlantic, but it's too early to say if it will have any impact on the U.S., and more specifically, South Carolina.

At 11 a.m., the National Hurricane Center confirmed the storm had gotten organized enough to be considered a tropical storm. 

It has maximum sustained winds of 50 miles an hour, and was moving west at 13 miles an hour.

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Forecasters say at this point, the storm poses no immediate threat to land. Long range models, even the ones that go out 7 days, don't even have the system near a land mass--that's how far out it is. However, it is expected to get stronger and become a hurricane.

Because of the distance, it will take several days to evaluate if it could be a problem for the U.S. A lot of factors could drive it's ultimate path, including a large low pressure ridge that will be moving into the Southeastern U.S. in a few days.

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News19's weather team, which includes hurricane expert Jim Gandy, will continue to track and monitor the storm in the coming days.

 

 

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