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What happens when your child has to quarantine? One Sumter mom explains

If a relative is quarantined, the district said, siblings are considered third party contacts and do not need to quarantine, but all should be monitored for symptoms

SUMTER, S.C. — It's the message no parent hopes to receive.

Your child is out of school after being possibly exposed to COVID-19.

Stephanie Eitzman said her two boys were sent home after a possible classroom exposure in the Sumter School District.

"Well, I was a little worried," Eitzman said. "We had to take them out and have them tested or keep them home for the next 10 days."

RELATED: Over 1,340 Sumter students quarantined after less than a week in class

According to a district spokesperson, more than 130 cases have been reported since school returned last Tuesday. This has led to more than 1,340 students to be quarantined, and 41 staff members. 

After being notified, Eitzman's next challenge was to decide whether or not her other child who attends class elsewhere should quarantine too.

“Since they live in the same home and were together, you know," she said.

If a relative is quarantined, the district said, siblings are considered third party contacts and do not need to quarantine, but all should be monitored for symptoms.

Eitzman decided to quarantine all her children as a precaution.

She said she waited for hours to get them tested for the virus at a healthcare facility in town.

While they've been home from school, she's been away from work.

RELATED: Sumter high school experiencing A/C problems

“It’s just been a little tough,” Eitzman said. “I’m trying to get them back and forth to school and I also have to work and having to take off the time for the possible exposures and what not, it’s just kind of inconvenient and it makes it rough to get the kids in a good routine.”

Thankfully, she says, they've all tested negative for the virus.

Her biggest concern now is whether or not it will happen again.

“I actually anticipate it happening again… since some people whom are asymptomatic are still positive, I guess you can’t, you just never know," Eitzman said. "I’m hoping that their negative results will allow them to go back and not affect them or anyone else.”