The South Carolina Education Lottery Commission has ruled they will not be paying out winners from the Christmas Day Holiday Cash Add-a-Play game.

The lottery said a glitch caused the game to create more $500 winners than it was supposed to.

During a lottery commission meeting Wednesday morning, they decided they will not pay out the winners that $500. Instead, they will reimburse those players for the money they spent on the tickets.

The resulted in millions of unintended winnings on Christmas day.

Between 5:51 p.m. to 7:53 p.m. on Christmas Day, officials say lottery terminals printed Holiday Cash Add‐A‐Play tickets with the same symbol repeated in all nine available play areas of the Add-A-Play ticket. They say winning tickets should have no more than five identical symbols on a single play.

Related: Malfunction Causes Lottery Game Confusion

To win, players had to get three Christmas trees in any vertical, horizontal or diagonal line.The error left many players with what appears to be a winning lottery ticket, but no money.

Related: South Carolina Education Lottery Players Upset After System Glitch

The South Carolina Education Lottery said that the computer system experienced a programming error on Christmas Day that affected Holiday Cash tickets.

Related: SC Lottery Still Investigating Christmas Day Mishap

Under state law, tickets produced in error aren't paid, according to interim South Carolina Education Lottery Executive Director Hogan Brown. However, officials put aside $19.6 million to cover claims from winners pending an investigation and receipt of legal advice.

Related: $19.6 Million Set Aside for Winners in SC Lottery Game Malfunction

After a review, officials said that amount of money would not be enough to cover the amount of claims from the two-hour period before the game was closed. Officials revised their estimate of money needed to pay out claims to $33.8 million.

Related: Holiday Lottery Glitch Claims Could Be Up to $33.8 Million

In February, lottery officials said they were working with Gaming Laboratories International to help determine if they will pay out the winnings, about $33 million dollars.