COLUMBIA, S.C. — The number of coronavirus cases in South Carolina now exceeds 100, based on new numbers released by the state's health agency late Friday afternoon.

There are now 45 new cases confirmed bringing the overall total to 125 cases in 25 counties.

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Richland County had the most new cases, with 14. For the first time, there are confirmed cases in Orangeburg, Sumter, and Clarendon Counties.

Here's a breakdown of the new cases: 

  • Aiken County: 1 new case
  • Anderson County: 3 new cases
  • Beaufort County: 1 new case
  • Berkeley County: 1 new case
  • Charleston County: 1 new case
  • Clarendon County: 1 new case
  • Darlington County: 1 new case
  • Florence County: 1 new case
  • Greenville County: 5 new cases
  • Horry County: 2 new cases
  • Kershaw County: 7 new cases
  • Lexington County: 3 new cases
  • Orangeburg County: 2 new cases
  • Pickens County: 1 new case
  • Richland County: 14 new cases
  • Sumter County: 1 new case

“The public needs to take our recommendations to prevent spread seriously so we can best protect our family, friends and neighbors,” said Dr. Linda Bell, State Epidemiologist. “Unfortunately, these case numbers will continue to increase. The agency is working around the clock to prevent the spread of this disease, focusing on those who are most high-risk for experiencing severe illness from the disease. I’d like to remind all South Carolinians that we all have a responsibility to take the recommended steps for limiting spread.”

DHEC said will continue to provide the number of positive cases and the county of residence. DHEC’s COVID-19 county map provides the number of cases by county and is updated daily.

It’s important to note that DHEC will always provide the information that’s necessary for residents to protect themselves. However, DHEC is obligated and required to protect every individual’s personal health information, especially cases that occur in small or other close-knit communities where even basic pieces of information could identify an individual. The department relies on residents trusting DHEC to not release their personal information so that they are cooperative and forthcoming during disease investigation activities.

“This will likely be an extended response and we want people to be prepared for more cases to occur and to continue to listen to and follow recommendations from public health officials,” Bell said.

Individuals with signs of illness are asked to stay at home and not attend public gatherings. South Carolinians are encouraged to monitor for symptoms, practice social distancing, avoid touching frequently touched items (i.e. doorknobs and rails), and regularly wash their hands, especially after being in a public place.

Anyone with concerns about their health should reach out to their healthcare provider. Several South Carolina health systems are offering telehealth options to the public. For telehealth options and the latest information about DHEC’s COVID-19 response efforts, please visit scdhec.gov/COVID19. For more information about COVID-19, visit the CDC website here.